New York Daily News, 1945

New York Daily News, 1945

greenfield-digitalhistory:

Eleanor Roosevelt surrounded on each side by students from the Summer School for Women Workers in Industry at Bryn Mawr College - Learn more:http://brynmawrcollections.org/greenfield/exhibits/show/the-summer-school-for-women-wo/introduction

greenfield-digitalhistory:

Eleanor Roosevelt surrounded on each side by students from the Summer School for Women Workers in Industry at Bryn Mawr College - Learn more:http://brynmawrcollections.org/greenfield/exhibits/show/the-summer-school-for-women-wo/introduction

drcjsnider:

Political cartoon of Eleanor Roosevelt - ‘Incense Burners’ Weekly Smoker with First Lady.”  1930s

drcjsnider:

Political cartoon of Eleanor Roosevelt - ‘Incense Burners’ Weekly Smoker with First Lady.”  1930s


Mrs Eleanor Roosevelt with members of the Women’s Land Service and triplet lambs, in Rotorua, New Zealand, 1943

Mrs Eleanor Roosevelt with members of the Women’s Land Service and triplet lambs, in Rotorua, New Zealand, 1943

poesizing:

incisiveogressprisms:

nooffswitch:

If you say Eleanor Roosevelt was a lesbian everyone nods knowingly and you get featured on all the big gay sites.

If you pose with her picture and say she was bisexual people freak out and send you anons detailing in various ways how you are wrong, she was a lesbian and not a dirty bisexual OR they tell you how to unfair it is to try and say what peoples sexualities were after they died.

Unless they are proclaimed monosexual of course.

Seriously?

I’m pretty sure the vast majority of people were not offended because they think bisexuals are “dirty.” They were offended because one of the very, very few lesbian historical figures, and I would wager one of the most if not the most prominent in the entire United States, was suddenly being misidentified as bisexual. We have no indication of any attraction Roosevelt felt for men or of a romantic aspect to her marriage with FDR. Instead we have documentation of a long term relationship with a woman.

Taking a woman for whom all evidence points to her being a lesbian and calling her bisexual does not make you radical. You are taking a woman who we have no reason to believe was attracted to men and saying she felt het attraction. In a society that expects all women, including and especially lesbians, to feel het attraction, this is not a revolutionary or queer act. In fact it is something of a violent act. Taking a lesbian and calling her bi is conferring het attraction on her which, surprise, is a form of straightwashing! So as a bisexual I can pretty confidently tell you that you are completely misinterpreting the situation, which could have been a learning experience for you.

this is so complicated because 

a) who “nods knowingly” when you say a major female historical figures like Eleanor Roosevelt were lesbians / queer? a small bunch of lesbians - while all the straight people freak out and tell them to stop trying to make everyone gay - the suggestion that Eleanor Roosevelt’s relationships with / attractions to men need to be “defended” from erasure by lesbians when 99% of the world regards those relationships and attractions as infinitely more valid than her relationships with / attractions to women comes off as really offensive 

b) the reasons why we (we, “lesbian historians” of sorts) think Eleanor Roosevelt was a lesbian and care about this fact enough to tell people about it are not unbiased, they’re indeed tinged with biphobia and with a more general understanding of chaste white upperclass lesbianism expressed primarily through “female friendships” as the queer female sexuality

Yep.

Eleanor Roosevelt on horseback trip with Lorena Hickok

Eleanor Roosevelt on horseback trip with Lorena Hickok

fyeah-history:

Eleanor Roosevelt’s pistol licence, 1957

fyeah-history:

Eleanor Roosevelt’s pistol licence, 1957

(via school-marm-charm)

GATLINBURG, Tennessee, Monday—We reached Natural Bridge on Saturday at about 7 p.m. after a most glorious drive through the Shenandoah Park. The Skyline Drive is really very beautiful. Having started late—at a quarter of 1, to be exact—we didn’t stop until nearly 3 o’clock, when we pulled out at one of the parking places with a glorious view down into a ravine and drank hot coffee. We had brought orange juice also, but our hands were so cold that we couldn’t unscrew the top. We’ve learned, however, to accept such vicissitudes with calm, and we were grateful that it happened to be the coffee which we were able to unscrew! With my usual optimism, I thought that Spring began in April, but it really was mid-Winter—beautiful, clear blue sky and cold as Greenland.

After dinner we wandered down to see the illumination and pageant. The lighting is beautiful, and gives it all a mysterious, almost prehistoric aspect. This morning after breakfast we walked down along the stream again, under the Bridge, and thought it just as impressive as it was last night. It is extraordinary to think what years it has taken of slowly dripping water to break through that stone wall, and the old arbor vitae trees, said to be over a thousand years old, were a tremendous surprise to me, for I didn’t know they ever lived that long.

Sunday’s drive began at 10:30, and, until we came in view of the Great Smokies, the scenery was not as impressive as it was yesterday. We were stopped once by a constable, who had a telegram that had evidently been following us since early morning. Miss Hickok was driving, and I cheered her by saying that, while I had no idea what she had done, I was sure we were going to be arrested, so she had the laugh on me when it turned out to be nothing more than a telegram urging me to stop at Greenville, Andrew Johnson’s birthplace. Unfortunately we had not allowed enough time for any stops along the road, and so I had to decline.

We reached Gatlinburg at about 7:30, and we are both enchanted with the hotel, in which the furniture is all made by local craftsmen. The rooms are panelled. The curtains are woven in the local craft shop. And, though it is too dark for me to be sure tonight, I have a feeling that we are going to look out tomorrow morning on a panorama of mountain tops.

The last thing we saw tonight, as we drove in, was the deep blue of the mountain sides in contrast with the white snow and the white clouds floating above, which looked almost like mountain peaks themselves. Mountains have a beauty and a calm which should have a soothing effect on the most worried of little human souls.

We’re off in the morning to Cades Cove, and I have to file this before I go, because the nearest telegraph office is in Knoxville, and I feel that, if I wait until I return in the afternoon, it might not get in in time.

E.R.

(Source: gwu.edu)

todaysdocument:

Frances Perkins: First Woman Cabinet member

80 years ago today, President Franklin D. Roosevelt notified the U.S. Senate on March 4, 1933, that he had nominated Frances Perkins of New York to be Secretary of Labor.  A lifelong labor reformer, she rose to prominence following the tragic Triangle Shirtwaist Fire. She was confirmed as Secretary of Labor and became the first woman appointed to a Cabinet position. She was the longest serving Labor secretary, serving for 12 years between 1933 and 1945. She was also the first woman to enter the Presidential Line of Succession.

Keep reading at Prologue: A Factory Fire and Frances Perkins

(via school-marm-charm)

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